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Nature Physics offers a unique mix of news and reviews alongside top-quality research papers. Published monthly, in print and online, the journal reflects the entire spectrum of physics, pure and applied.
Updated: 6 hours 10 min ago

The illusion of infinity

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01540-z

The illusion of infinity

A slow burn

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01545-8

A slow burn

A shaking phase transition

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01543-w

Isolated gases of ultracold atoms have long provided a window into the study of continuous quantum phase transitions. Discontinuous quantum phase transitions have now been observed in a shaken lattice gas of strongly interacting atoms.

Accelerate to the next level

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01562-7

The merits of conventional particle accelerators range from fundamental science to applications like radiotherapy. Plasma-based accelerators are getting up to speed and may overtake conventional ones in the near future.

The earth-shaking discovery of magnitude

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01546-7

The coexistence of qualitative and quantitative scales characterizes advances in earthquake measurements. Although often confused, intensity and magnitude refer to very different things, as Leonardo Benini explains.

The beat of isolated cilia

Tue, 15/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 15 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01502-5

Individual cilia are typically attached to cell surfaces, where they sweep back and forth. A new study charts the behavioural space of the beating patterns of cilia isolated from the cell.

Darkness tamed with superconducting qubits

Mon, 14/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 14 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01571-6

Photon emission is a major source of decoherence for several quantum technologies. Four superconducting qubits have been combined to create a ‘dark state’ qubit with strongly suppressed photon emission due to collective interference effects.

Ready for translational research

Mon, 14/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 14 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01547-6

Laser accelerators promised to deliver high-energy particle beams for biomedical uses, but have struggled to meet constraints on dose control and stability. An experiment now enables translational research with proton beams at ultrahigh dose rate.

Coherent control of a multi-qubit dark state in waveguide quantum electrodynamics

Mon, 14/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 14 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01527-w

Dark states of quantum systems do not absorb or emit light, removing a major source of decoherence. Four superconducting qubits in a waveguide can be combined to make a coherently controlled dark-state qubit with a long lifetime.

Tumour irradiation in mice with a laser-accelerated proton beam

Mon, 14/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 14 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01520-3

A laser–plasma accelerator provides proton beams for the precise irradiation of human tumours in a mouse model. This work advances translational research with ultrahigh proton dose rates at laser-driven sources.

Dipolar excitonic insulator in a moiré lattice

Thu, 10/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 10 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01532-z

A heterostructure supports the equilibrium bound states of an electron and hole—excitons—that strongly interact with each other. This provides a platform for the quantum simulation of bosonic lattice models.

Fermi surface transformation at the pseudogap critical point of a cuprate superconductor

Thu, 10/03/2022 - 00:00

Nature Physics, Published online: 10 March 2022; doi:10.1038/s41567-022-01514-1

Transport measurements suggest that the Fermi surface of a cuprate superconductor changes its form when the pseudogap is present. This can help to explain the low carrier density in the pseudogap regime.

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University of Crete - Department of Physics  - Voutes University Campus - GR-70013 Heraklion, Greece
phone: +30 2810 394300 - email: chair@physics.uoc.gr